Monday, April 18, 2011

Vislogix wins Digital Screenmedia Association 2011 Award of Excellence for Vanderbilt Project!

Project: Vanderbilt University Library
Client: Anode
Submitted by: vislogix

Brief overview of the project/technology:
When Anode hired vislogix to design a dynamic interactive centerpiece for Vanderbilt's six-million-dollar renovation of the Jean and Alexander Heard Library, we collectively came up with a very challenging but unique and engaging concept utilizing our Respondr interactive system. The end result was an interactive floor projection display comprised of a series of morphing shapes that are filled with real time student search queries from within the Vanderbilt Library. These searches are first filtered and parsed for inappropriate content and are then dynamically displayed into three different transitioning word shapes as described. Each search term when displayed goes it's own life cycle which is evidenced by color shifts before being replaced by a new term. All word positioning within each shape is based on a variety of algorithms including character count. Additionally a custom interface was created to allow a variety of customizations such as color schemes and time delays of the various interactive objects. Initially deployed word shapes include a Star, the Vanderbilt "V", and the Vanderbilt Oakleaf, while new shapes are currently being considered to constantly keep the display fresh and original.

Objectives of the deployment or the technology:
Objectives included creating a custom version of Respondr that was tied into the library's computer network with a custom designed program that would pull real-time student searches, parse and filter for profanities and inappropriate terms (along with a black list), and finally pull the cleared terms into the system at which point a variety of custom algorithms determined where in each morphing shape a particular word would be positioned. The floor projected display then would react to motion in the center of the library lobby as students, faculty and visitors engage with the word shapes.

Results achieved:
Results in a unique deployment such as this are not measured in terms of ROI as much as they are about the overall student, faculty and visitor experience. Everyone was extremely satisfied with the results and the system has been running error free since October 2010. Currently additional shapes are being considered to further enhance the library's desire to accentuate holidays, seasons, etc.

Size and geographic location(s) of the deployment:
Single custom installation in Nashville, TN. The application receives several hundred interactions daily.

Selected judges comments:

  • Overall a very unique and interactive device. It's clear that this is a design feature. Very well done.

  • The challenges of such high end user engagement coupled with approaches to assure that standards of content practice and policies are maintained appear to be thoughtfully met with this advanced application. Vanderbilt is to be applauded!

  • Nice implementation. Good overall design with neat functionality.

  • Wow. Nice out of the box thinking. Clever use of Google words. Developers understood that library card catalog and reference system formed the basis of the Google search magic and its billion dollar market cap.